Bird Families

Red-breasted piebald kingfisher

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Red-breasted piebald kingfisher

The red-breasted piebald kingfisher reaches a length of 40 cm. Its upper part of the head and wings are gray. He has a white collar around his neck. His chest is reddish orange. The male can be recognized by its toothed tuft. The female has a gray stripe on the chest, which is bounded on the side of the belly by a thin white ring. Hence the Latin specific epithet torquata.

There is a small likelihood of confusing the red-breasted piebald kingfisher with the belted piebald kingfisher Megaceryle alcyon, which appears in winter in the northern nesting areas of the red-breasted piebald kingfisher, but still it is much smaller, and the females are not colored in the predominant reddish orange color.

Throughout the year, the species keeps in the nesting area.

1. Distribution

The area of ​​distribution of the species extends from the south of Patagonia and the north of Tierra del Fuego through the distant parts of the South American continent up to the southern border regions of the United States. In South America, only the main Andes chain, the Atacama Desert, and northwest Argentina are not inhabited by this species. Red-breasted piebald kingfishers inhabit various living spaces up to heights of 1,500 m. Birds prefer forested banks of slowly flowing rivers and lakes. Often the species can be found in mangrove forests, river estuaries, in the southern areas of distribution also in fjords. She is not afraid of human proximity and is also found in rice fields, along irrigation ditches and canals, and even near reservoirs of large parks.

2. Nutrition

The bird feeds mainly on fish, while amphibians and reptiles are of minor importance. Most of the large prey of 20 cm is obtained from an ambush located at an altitude of 5 to 10 m.

3. Reproduction

Both partners dig up a nesting cave up to 2.5 m long more often in sandy slopes along rivers, less often on slopes along roads, away from river flows. At the end of the nest tunnel is the nest chamber. Clutch of 3-6 eggs is incubated by both parents. They feed chicks hatched after 22 days on average for about 35 days.

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The red-breasted piebald kingfisher (Latin Megaceryle torquata) is the largest kingfisher on the American continent.

The red-breasted piebald kingfisher reaches a length of 40 cm. Its upper part of the head and wings are gray. He has a white collar around his neck. His chest is reddish orange. The male can be recognized by its toothed tuft. The female has a gray stripe on the chest, which is bounded from the side of the belly by a thin white ring. Hence the Latin specific epithet torquata.

There is a slight likelihood of confusing the Red-breasted Pied Kingfisher with the Belted Pied Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon), which appears in the northern nesting areas of the Red-breasted Pied Kingfisher in winter, and yet it is considerably smaller and the females are not dominated by reddish orange.

Throughout the year, the species keeps in the nesting area.

The area of ​​distribution of the species extends from the south of Patagonia and the north of Tierra del Fuego through the distant parts of the South American continent up to the southern border regions of the United States. In South America, only the main Andean chain, the Atacama Desert, and northwest Argentina are not inhabited by this species. Red-breasted piebald kingfishers inhabit various living spaces up to heights of 1,500 m. Birds prefer forested shores of slowly flowing rivers and lakes. Often the species can be found in mangrove forests, river estuaries, in the southern areas of distribution also in fjords. She is not afraid of human proximity and is also found in rice fields, along irrigation ditches and canals, and even near reservoirs of large parks.

The bird feeds mainly on fish, while amphibians and reptiles are of minor importance. Most of the large prey (20 cm) is obtained from an ambush located at an altitude of 5 to 10 m.

Both partners dig a nesting cave up to 2.5 m long more often in sandy slopes along rivers, less often on slopes along roads, away from river flows. At the end of the nest tunnel is the nest chamber. Clutch of 3-6 eggs is incubated by both parents. They feed chicks hatched after 22 days on average for about 35 days.

Boehme R.L., Flint V.E. A five-language dictionary of animal names. Birds. Latin, Russian, English, German, French. / under the general editorship of Acad. V.E.Sokolova. - M .: Rus. lang., "RUSSO", 1994. - P. 175. - 2030 copies. - ISBN 5-200-00643-0

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