Bird Families

Desert Kamenka / Oenanthe deserti

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298. Desert Stove - Oenanthe deserti Temm. (table LV)

Black-footed stove - Oenanthe hispanica L. (tab. LV)

Black-necked heater - Oenanthe finchii Heugl. (table LV)

Black heater - Oenanthe picata Blyth (table LV)

IN. From a sparrow. OP. Slender birds with long legs. Males of almost all species are white, with black wings, throat and tail. There are large white spots on the sides of the tail. In the black wheatear, males are completely black in color, with a white uppertail and a white uppertail. A desert stove has a clay-ash back. Females and juveniles are clay-gray with white spots on the tail and upper tail. They stick to the ground or stones. They often wag their tail. G. All species have a loud check-check. From. Young and females of all wheatears in the field are indistinguishable from each other. B. Open dry areas with sparse vegetation. HP. Migratory birds. Mr. Nests in burrows or crevices between rocks. Clutch contains 5-6 blue eggs.

Kamenka

299. Kamenka - Oenanthe oenanthe L. (table LV) IN. From a sparrow. OP. A small slender bird with long legs. Male coloration in spring and summer is ash-gray above. The wings, tail and wide stripe across the eye to the ear are black. The underside of the body is buffy-white. The female, juveniles and the male are painted in a monochromatic clay-brownish color in autumn with darker wings and tail, white spots on the tail and white uppertail. Keeps on the ground. Frightened, she runs back, crouching, bowing and wagging her tail. In a bird that has taken off, the white upper tail and white spots on the sides of the black tail are clearly visible. Fluttering flight. The male rises into the air with singing, fluttering in place with his wings and spreading his tail. G. Voiced "check-check". The song is varied, consisting of imitating the voices of other birds and various sounds. From. Females, juveniles and autumn birds are practically indistinguishable from the females of other wheatears and from the dancing wheatear. B. Open spaces. HP. Migrant. Mr. Nest in burrows or deep crevices between rocks. Clutch contains 5-6 light blue eggs.

Meadow coinage

301. Meadow minting - Saxicola rubetra L. (Table LIV) IN. Somewhat smaller than a sparrow. OP. A small bird. The upper side of the body is brownish with light streaks. A dark brown stripe runs through the eye, ending in a large spot on the cheeks. The base of the tail, the stripe on the shoulders, the eyebrow and the abdomen are white. The throat and chest are buffy-red. The female is dimmer. Juveniles are buffy-brownish with a white tail base and light streaks. Kept in pairs or alone. Usually seen sitting on a tall blade of grass, the top branch of a bush, or on the ground. G. Loud tzi-check-check. The song is short, chirping. From. It differs from the black-headed chasing with a light eyebrow. Young birds are very similar to young black-headed chicks and are practically indistinguishable from them in the field. B. Meadows with scattered bushes. HP. Migrant. Mr. A nest on the ground. In clutch there are 5-6 greenish-blue eggs with light rusty specks.

Black-headed coin (Saxicola torquata)

Appearance: In the male, the head, throat, back, wings and tail are black, the chest is rusty-red, the abdomen, a wide stripe on the shoulders, upper tail, and sometimes the base of the tail are white. In the female, the black color is replaced by brown-gray. Juveniles are brown with light streaks.
The size: Body length = 13-15cm, weight = 12-13g. Less sparrow.

Features: The black-headed coinage differs from the meadow coinage by a black or brown head.

Habits: Usually seen sitting on a tall blade of grass or bush. Twitches his tail. It is kept alone and in pairs.
Nature of stay: Migrant.

Food: Insects.
Feature article
Breeding area: Dry open areas with sparse bushes.
Location of the socket and its description: On the ground. The main material is cereal stalks and moss.
Egg laying time: May June
Eggs color and size: Bluish green with reddish dots, 2x1.5 cm.

Common stove (Oenanthe oenanthe)

Appearance: In the male in spring and summer, the top of the head and back are ash-gray, a wide strip from the beak through the eye to the ear, the wings and tail are black, the stripes on the sides of the tail, the upper tail and the entire bottom of the body are white. The female, juveniles and the male are buffy-brownish above in autumn, their throat and chest are reddish, the upper tail and abdomen are white.
The size: Body length = 15-17cm, weight = 22-26g. From a sparrow.

Features: The male differs from other wheatears by a gray back. Females and juveniles in nature are very similar to the dancer wheather and females of other wheatears, differing only in a darker reddish chest and darker wings.

Habits: An ordinary stove is kept on the ground and on stones. The flight is fast, usually low above the ground. Sitting on a prominent stone, post or stump, bows, twitching its tail. He moves on the ground by jumping, squatting from time to time. It is kept alone and in pairs.
Nature of stay: Migrant.

Food: Insects, spiders. It collects food on the ground between stones and plants, but sometimes catches prey, flying up into the air after it.
Short Sketch + Photo
Feature article
Breeding area: Open, mostly dry landscapes in plains and mountains. Pastures, roads, embankments, ravines, river cliffs, rocky placers.
Location of the socket and its description: In the hole, cracks in the rocks, between stones, in the piles of firewood. Loose heap of stems, leaves, grass and roots.
Egg laying time: May June
Eggs color and size: Light blue, 2x1.5 cm.

Desert Kamenka (Oenanthe deserti)

Appearance: In the male, the top of the head and back are buffy-grayish, the throat, sides of the head and neck, the wings and tail are black, the bottom of the body, the upper tail and the base of the tail are white. The female and juveniles lack black color on the throat and sides of the head, and the wings and tail are brownish.
The size: From a sparrow.

Features: The male differs from other wheatens by its buffy back. The female and juveniles are very similar to the females of other wheatears, differing only in a lighter color.

Habits: It keeps alone and in pairs on the ground and on stones.
Nature of stay: Migrant.

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